Posts Tagged: learning disabilities

#inthenews: July edition

Want to listen to this post? Highlight text, click the speaker, and it will be read aloud to you, thanks to GSpeech technology! I have seen the Great Predictor of Reading Disabilities pop up #inthenews multiple, trusted sources, so I felt the need to comment. I have to admit that my thoughts on this aren’t 100%… Read more »

Closed Captioning to Support Literacy

Turning closed captioning on while a child watches video content helps children with hearing or auditory-rooted difficulties, but I also frequently recommend closed captioning for students with dyslexia and other reading-based differences. Sound counterintuitive? It has two goals: One is simply to expose children to text in multiple facets of their life since we don’t want children… Read more »

#ISTE2015: Wednesday Round-Up

Last day of #ISTE2015, and what a ride it’s been! @EdTechKaraoke was nuts! Yet I managed to make it to the first session at 8:30 :º) It was led primarily by Mark Surabian (@marksurabian), with assistance by John Calvert (@jcalvert4). Mark is an assistive technologist, and our paths have crossed before at the Everyone Reading conference… Read more »

#ISTE2015: Tuesday Round-Up

Another crazy, learning-filled day! I may have to split it into two parts because there was just! So! Much! My first session of the day was from Erin Klein (@KleinErin) and Pernille Ripp (@pernilleripp), two engaging & charming speakers, who are both still in the classroom. I have so much respect for professional development-providers who… Read more »

#ISTE2015: Monday Round-Up

I feel like I saw so much, and yet I know each session time and exhibitor viewing came with several sacrifices, so I’m excited to read about other people’s experiences, so I can hear what I missed! I’m grateful to the presenters who uploaded their handouts, so that I may view them even if I… Read more »

Testing Accommodations: What to do with Extra Time

Many of my students spent the last month or so taking a standardized assessment of some type or another. While I don’t typically teach traditional “test prep,” I do work on metacognition a lot, therefore I discuss testing strategies that can be beneficial for my students. Among them, are what do with that darn extended time… Read more »

Stop #summerslide: Reading Fluency (Middle School Edition)

Continuing on my quest to stop #summerslide, below are some resources to share with upper elementary, middle school/middle grades students, and even high schoolers. Reading Fluency Tips (Middle Grades)   General Tips/Thoughts reading fluency includes rate, accuracy, and intonation of reading. These can be worked on separately, or all together almost all kids are helped… Read more »

Stop #summerslide: Reading Fluency (Elementary Edition)

I have read several excellent articles about how & why summer slide happens, how we can prevent it, and why it is essential that we do. I will be linking to those articles in a new blog post soon. In the meantime, I wanted to share some tip sheets that I have been providing for… Read more »

Strengths of People with Learning Disabilities

I’m so proud of my article on Noodle.com about strengths of people with Learning Disabilities. I had excellent editors, and it’s certainly more comprehensive than the nugget it started from (on this site). Read it, share it, upvote it, comment on it, whatever you do, remember it as you work with students with learning disabilities.

Portrait of a Great Teacher

Great Teacher gets to work a few minutes early so she* can chat with the other Early Birds. Having one-on-one non-academic conversations with each student is crucial. This helps students feel respected, and in turn, it helps them respect you back (which reduces behavioral issues). Great teacher happily discusses her weekend with her students at… Read more »